February 13 – March 30, 2014
LISL PONGER

Lisl Ponger, Making of a Secession Exhibition, 2013
IBON ARANBERRI

Ibon Aranberri, Found Dead, 2007, Courtesy Galería Pepe Cobo, Lima
ULRIK HELTOFT

Ulrik Heltoft, Kabinet, 2014, Filmstill



April 11 – June 8, 2014
HEINRICH DUNST

Heinrich Dunst, RAR, 2012, Photo: Markus Wörgötter, courtesy Galerie nächst St. Stephan Rosemarie Schwarzwälder
LITTLE WARSAW

Little Warsaw & Miklós Erhardt, Ship of Fools – A Recuperation, 2008, Film still
KERSTIN VON GABAIN




June 26 – August 24, 2014
A SINGULAR FORM
Curated by Pablo Lafuente

Asier Mendizabal, Untitled (Forcola #1), 2013



September 11 – November 2, 2014 
DIANA AL-HADID


Diana Al-Hadid, studio view 2014. Courtesy: artist, Marianne Boesky Gallery and OHWOW Gallery. Photo: Jason Wyche
UTOPIAN PULSE –
FLARES IN THE DARKROOM
  

Giuseppe Campuzano, Photomontage, Courtesy Giuseppe Campuzano
CINTHIA MARCELLE


Cinthia Marcelle und Tiago Mata Machado, O Século (The Century), 2011, Videostill



November 21, 2014 – January 25, 2015  
CHTO DELAT?

Chto Delat?, installation view of Russian Woods at BWA Wroclav, 2013
RENATA LUCAS

PETER BARTOŠ

Peter Bartoš, Zooparticipacie, ca. 1976



February – September 2014
URGENT ALTERNATIVES: UTOPIAN MOMENTS – 7 Banners




PERMANENT EXHIBITION
Gustav Klimt: THE BEETHOVEN FRIEZE




OPENING HOURS

GUIDED TOURS
Tuesday to Sunday 10.00 a.m. – 6.00 p.m.

Saturdays at 3.00 p.m. and Sundays at 11.00 a.m.





Lisl Ponger
The Vanishing Middle Class
February 13 – March 30, 2014

Lisl Ponger, Making of a Secession Exhibition, 2013
Lisl Ponger, Making of a Secession Exhibition, 2013

Lisl Ponger's art has long explored the constructed nature of (cultural) identity, our—often stereotypical—ideas about and images of the "Other," and the associated questions of visual representation.

In the Secession's main hall, Ponger will now be realizing a project she has wanted to do for a long time: the Museum für fremde und vertraute Kulturen [Museum for Foreign and Familiar Cultures], in short MuKul. Although the museum is fictional, its design is based on painstaking research. It is an almost disturbingly detailed recreation of real ethnological museums, a growing number of which have recently adopted names such as world museum, museum of cultures, and the like. The exhibits are identified with inventory numbers and places and dates of purchase, and the museum has object and section labels as well as panels listing the museum staff and all lenders. In a bow to popular demand, there is even a Photopoint in the lobby where visitors can pose for pictures in front of a backdrop.

Lisl Ponger presents two exhibitions in the four rooms of the MuKul: The Vanishing Middle Class, a show that undertakes what is known as "salvage ethnology" by recording and documenting as many facets as possible of the life of an ethnic group whose future is in peril, and the special exhibition Lisl Ponger. Wild Places with a number of photographic works the artist created between 2000 and 2010.

Lisl Ponger was born in Nuremberg in 1947 and lives and works in Vienna.

The exhibition is accompanied by a publication with texts by James Clifford, Yvette Mutumba and Tim Sharp.
Invited by the board of the Secession
Curated by Jeanette Pacher



Ibon Aranberri
Finite Location
13. Februar – 30. März 2014

Ibon Aranberri, Found Dead, 2007, Courtesy Galería Pepe Cobo, Lima
Ibon Aranberri, Found Dead, 2007, Courtesy Galería Pepe Cobo, Lima

Ibon Aranberri's art presents a critical exploration of the complex interconnections between aesthetics, history, and politics. He devotes particular attention to the exhibition format, which he regards as highly significant aesthetic and spatial event that functions like an organism: the autonomy and individuality of the various works is subordinate to the interplay of the interconnections, affiliations, and contradictions between them.

In his exhibition Finite Location at the Secession, Aranberri slips into the role of curator to implement a reconfiguration of existing works. With a view to the idea of an imaginary landscape, he sets up the large-format photography installation Política Hidráulica (Water Policy, 2004–2010) face to face with the sculpture Found Dead (2007) and the empty casting mold for a bronze sculpture of an "unknown philosopher". The common denominator of these three works lies in their original readings, in which they revolve around themes of the landscape, the monument, and the representation of power. The title Aranberri has chosen for the exhibition, Finite Location, emphasizes the temporary nature of this installation, which contains the seeds of its dismantlement even at the moment it is put together. In designing the presentation, he creates a complex whole that sublates the original contexts and intentions of the individual works while also undermining the cycle of the production, presentation, and commercial valorization of works of art.

Ibon Aranberri was born in Itziar, Basque country, and lives and works in Bilbao.

Invited by the board of the Secession
Curated by Bettina Spörr



Ulrik Heltoft
Kabinet
February 13 – March 30, 2014

Ulrik Heltoft, Kabinet, 2014, Filmstill
Ulrik Heltoft, Kabinet, 2014, Film still

There is something subtly mysterious about the films and photographs of the Danish artist Ulrik Heltoft. Drawing on literary narratives or scientific sources, his works often explore the conceptual and aesthetic potentials of specific technologies. Despite his experimental use of his media, his photography evinces a uniform clear and brilliant quality.

In his show at the Secession, Heltoft presents his new film Kabinet, which combines animated sections with live-action sequences to stage the protagonist's triple encounter with his own spirit in the past, present, and future—in other words, with himself as a young man, his present self, and what the future may bring. The film is based on a piece of social critique that has been adapted for the screen many times: Charles Dickens's novella A Christmas Carol (1843), in which the confrontation with the ghost inspires the old and stingy businessman Ebenezer Scrooge to open his heart and change his ways. Kabinet was produced in the high-resolution format 4K, whose crystal-clear the depiction of details creates an almost uncanny realism. As in earlier works, Heltoft uses technology to build ambiguities and construct moments that hover between reality and dream, between phantasms and disillusionment. "The reality of dreams is what interests me," as Heltoft puts it.

Ulrik Heltoft, born in 1973, lives and works in Copenhagen.

The exhibition is accompanied by an artist book with a text by François Piron.
Invited by the board of the Secession
Curated by Annette Südbeck



Heinrich Dunst
DA
April 11 – June 8, 2014

Heinrich Dunst, RAR, 2012, Photo: Markus Wörgötter, courtesy Galerie nächst St. Stephan Rosemarie Schwarzwälder
Heinrich Dunst, RAR, 2012, Photo: Markus Wörgötter, courtesy Galerie nächst St. Stephan Rosemarie Schwarzwälder

Heinrich Dunst’s spatial interventions and performances address the hierarchies of signification and boundaries of meaning in aesthetic systems and orders of knowledge, and more particularly, the dualism of word and image. Assembling elements made from a variety of media, such as letters cut from synthetic materials, everyday objects, gestural-monochrome paintings, projections, or particleboard walls, he constructs dramaturgic ensembles that invalidate the conventional logic of meaning. To this end, he stages paradoxical formal plays, for example, between what is primary and what is subordinate, between inclusion and exclusion from the frame, between multiplication and the shifting proportions between model and exhibition. The distinctive quality of his artistic choices is the deliberate variance and openness of meaning they generate. His works may often equally well be read as standalone graphemic signs, sculptural objects, or traces of the artistic subject set in a perceptual context that includes their spatial surroundings.

Heinrich Dunst’s conceptual approach is rooted in the scene of 1980s Vienna, where artists endeavored to extend abstract painting into the exhibition space and give it contextual definition. Painting and the analysis of the functions of exhibition components remain a relevant frame of reference in his most recent works, such as the show About A B order (Galerie nächst St. Stephan, Vienna, 2013). Yet Dunst lends these issues new topicality by drawing a multifaceted picture and questioning the ostensibly unequivocal references he invokes, ultimately revealing the presuppositions on which art rests.

Heinrich Dunst was born in Hallein in 1955 and lives and works in Vienna.

Invited by the board of the Secession
Curated by Annette Südbeck



Little Warsaw
Naming You
April 11 – June 8, 2014

Little Warsaw & Miklós Erhardt, Ship of Fools – A Recuperation, 2008, Film still
Little Warsaw & Miklós Erhardt, Ship of Fools – A Recuperation, 2008, Film still

Since 1999, the two Budapest-based Hungarian artists András Gálik and Bálint Havas have realized joint art projects under the name Little Warsaw. In films, performances, and installations, they explore history and its interpretations, the collective consciousness and established visual languages and traditions. The analysis of society’s engagement with history is a crucial factor in their work; the role of the artist as a producer of images, objects, or situations that are embedded in, or illustrate, a (historical) context is up for debate, as is the reception of works of art as a dynamic process (one that is subject to changing sociopolitical realities).

One preferred strategy Little Warsaw use to generate (new) collective awareness of what has faded into obscurity or was never perceived in the first place is the re- or novel contextualization of monuments and artistic artifacts. The displacement or spatial—and hence contextual—transfer is one of their preferred methods whereas these temporary interventions always leave the physical integrity of the object untouched.

Their contribution to the Hungarian pavilion at the 2003 Venice Biennale was the temporary union of the famous Bust of Nefertiti at the Egyptian Museum, Berlin, and a bronze body the artists had manufactured in Budapest (The Body of Nefertiti, 2003). The historic and the contemporary sculpture were joined for no more than a few hours in a closed ceremony at the museum; in the exhibition, the artists presented the (headless) body along with a film documenting the artistic intervention at the heart of their project.

Isolation Exercise (2005), a remake of the eponymous performance the Hungarian artist Tamás Szentjóby created in 1972, and Spiel der Wandlungen (2010), a restage of a performance by Jochen Gerz from 1972 are examples of the reenactments and reconstructions of works of art in which Little Warsaw examine the reception of historic pieces in a contemporary context and the significance of the co-presence of artist and audience.

András Gálik (b. 1970) and Bálint Havas (b. 1971) live and work in Budapest.

Invited by the board of the Secession<


Kerstin von Gabain
Raver geht ins archäologische Museum
April 11 – June 8, 2014

Kerstin von Gabain, Gipsfüße, 2014, Courtesy Gabriele Senn Galerie
Kerstin von Gabain, Gipsfüße, 2014, Courtesy Gabriele Senn Galerie

Many of von Gabain's works enter into unusual and surprising liaisons. In her exhibition City of broken furniture, which was on display in the galleries of the MAK (Museum of Applied Arts, Vienna) in 2013, she presented pieces of furniture in the role of "patients," "dressing" their "wounds," and contrasted them with a photographic series about furniture in the MAK's collections. In a nod to twentieth-century medical documentaries, the photographs bear titles that quote the names of illnesses or suggest classificatory schemes such as Syphilis or 6 Verbrecher (6 Criminals). In a series of photographs created in Tokyo in 2011, she staged used futons and mattresses in the style of Nobuyoshi Araki's bondage pictures. The artist also uses her own body in laconic or provocative observations about stereotypes as well as flashes of visual humor.

Von Gabain's earlier installations and interventions often relied on found and humble materials and a characteristic repertoire of images and forms, including speaker towers, banners, and slide shows. The artist works with various modes of appropriation, adapting subcultural practices or refashioning furniture and entire rooms resulting in analogies and unexpected moments. Her photographs, which play a growing role in her creative output, tell stories of such absurd situations.

In the Secession's Grafisches Kabinett, von Gabain presents new work created for this exhibition that elaborates on her previous oeuvre. Analogue black-and-white photographs that suggest an archaeological inventory are combined with several sculptural works. Some pictures show plaster casts of fragmentary limbs; in others, the artist can be seen extending her own body in a performative play with the prosthesis-like objects, exploring cultural and social paradigms and translating them into distinctive artistic ideas.

Kerstin von Gabain was born in Palo Alto (USA) in 1979 and lives and works in Vienna.

Invited by the board of the Secession
Curated by Bettina Spörr



A SINGULAR FORM
Curated by Pablo Lafuente
With works by Martha Araújo, Ricardo Basbaum, Dustin Ericksen, Asger Jorn (with Gérard Franceschi),
Hilary Lloyd, Asier Mendizabal, Peter Madsen, Bruno Munari, Nicole Wermers, and a few other things
June 26 – August 24, 2014

Asier Mendizabal, Untitled (Forcola #1), 2013
Asier Mendizabal, Untitled (Forcola #1), 2013

A Singular Form brings together works of art and 'everyday' objects in order to pursue potential uses and meanings that go beyond those usually assigned to them. On display at Secession, these objects should not only propose a particular approach or specific use by virtue of their mere materiality and compositional form; they should also enact a release from such determinations.

A critical engagement with the form and potential meanings of art and non-art objects might be an all too generic and abstract undertaking. A Singular Form attempts to make it concrete by focusing on the sculptural form, accompanied by a displacement from the sculptural to the functional. This shift intends to present the material structures of the objects as part of a changing network of relations or a sequence of activities (such as contemplation, action, use, and transformation) in which they serve, alternately, as the basis, as the catalyst, or as the result.

The exhibition poses the following two questions: How concrete or how specific can an object of mediation be? And to what extent can it be abstracted and made generic? Attempts at responding are made through a variety of objects, such as a Viking mastefisk and a kølsvin, constructed by Peter Madsen; a number of photographic contact prints from Asger Jorn and Gérard Franceschi's project 10,000 Years of Nordic Folk Art; a Venetian forcola; a video projection by Hilary Lloyd; Martha Araújo's wearable geometric canvas; a 'portable' sculpture by Bruno Munari; a stretcher; a series of spoons by Nicole Wermers; a travelling object and its housing structure by Ricardo Basbaum; a batea mapuche; a wallpaper and modular sculpture by Dustin Ericksen; and a number of sculptural pieces, prints and support units by Asier Mendizabal. The display frames and organises these objects as both things and images in order to heighten their potential agency—a power that questions fixed attributions of function and thus also alters the conditions under which life can occur around them.

The display frames and organises the shown objects as both things and images in order to heighten their potential agency—a power that questions fixed attributions of function and thus also alters the conditions under which life can occur around them.

Much of the thinking and doing around this exhibition has been developed in very close collaboration with Asier Mendizabal.

Pablo Lafuente was born in Spain in 1976 and lives in London.

A book with essays by Franz Boas, Roger Caillois, Fernand Deligny, Asger Jorn, and Pablo Lafuente will be published in conjunction with the exhibition.



Diana Al-Hadid
The Fates
September 11 – November 2, 2014

Diana Al-Hadid, studio view 2014. Courtesy: artist, Marianne Boesky Gallery and OHWOW Gallery. Photo: Jason Wyche
Diana Al-Hadid, studio view 2014. Courtesy: artist, Marianne Boesky Gallery and OHWOW Gallery. Photo: Jason Wyche

In her exhibition The Fates, the sculptor Diana Al-Hadid presents an installation of large-format sculptures and wall pictures. Most of the elements were created specifically for the show in the Secession's main gallery.

Her multimedia pieces, multilayered structures made out of ordinary building materials, look like alien places that bridge distances in time and space. The interlocking shapes, surfaces, and cavities appear to be suspended between decay and construction—everything seems afloat and in motion, aspiring to rise and yet already collapsing.

Diana Al-Hadid's art is based on an open-ended artistic process of experimentation with traditional sculptural practices and playful shifts between flatness and spatial depth and different scales. In her most recent work, the artist also draws on European Renaissance and Mannerist painting: taking inspiration from the period's landscapes, poses, and compositions, she translates their pictorial illusionism into three dimensions.

In conjunction with The Fates an artist's book will be published showing the process through which the eponymous exhibition and its works have developed.

Diana Al-Hadid was born in Aleppo (Syria) in 1981, grew up in Canton, Ohio (U.S.) , and lives and works in New York City.

Invited by the board of the Secession
Curated by Annette Südbeck



UTOPIAN PULSE – FLARES IN THE DARKROOM
A research project by Ines Doujak and Oliver Ressler
In collaboration with a group of international artist-curators
September 11 – November 2, 2014

Barat Ali Batoor, The Unseen Road to Asylum, Photograph, 2013
Barat Ali Batoor, The Unseen Road to Asylum, Photograph, 2013

We understand "Utopia" as an alternative that is always incomplete: the invocation within the given world of something incompatible with, and hostile to, the existing conditions. So it is a negation of what is and a recognition that "something is missing," but also a necessarily imperfect assertion of that which is not (yet).

The project explores utopian projections that might serve the purposes of breaking away—Secession—from, and resistance to, our particular present. The "negative" or "critical" version of the utopian "impulse" is not just a matter of satire, or of drawing up a list of what is wrong with the world (as though listing its flaws could make a difference). Instead, utopia is the assertion of the unrealized in and against the real.

UTOPIAN PULSE—FLARES IN THE DARKROOM as an exhibition at the Secession will be divided into seven salons and brings together cultural producers who have substantial artistic and curatorial practices. Over two month they will show and discuss works by other artists in the gallery of the Secession in Vienna. The contributions of the individual artist-curators will not be shown sequentially but brought into productive interaction with one another. The outcomes—whatever their form—will constitute a collective challenge to the constituent roles of social actors within the field of art in more complex ways than simply as "artists," "curators," and "viewers", in order to imagine new forms of exchange.

The sequence of exhibitions at the Secession consists of Salon Public Happiness (curated by Christoph Schäfer, September 11 – 16, 2014), Salon-E-Girdbad [Salon of the Whirlwind] (curated by Mariam Ghani, September 17 – 23, 2014), Salon Orizzonti Occupati (curated by Bert Theis, September 24 – 30, 2014), Salon Fluchthilfe (curated by Zanny Begg, October 01 – 07, 2014), Salon DADADA (AND AND AND with Ben Morea, October 08 – 14, 2014), Cuartos de Utopía (curated by Pedro G. Romero/Máquina P.H., October 15 – 21, 2014) and Salón de Belleza (curated by Miguel A. López, October 22 – November 02, 2014).

The research exhibition at the Secession will be accompanied by interventions in other formats such as large-format posters announcing the artist-curators on the building's façade.

Utopia is Secession without instructions.

Invited by the board of the Secession
Funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) AR 183-G21

Utopian Pulse
Complete program



Cinthia Marcelle
Dust Never Sleeps
September 11 – November 2, 2014

Cinthia Marcelle, The Tempest, 2014, photograph. Courtesy of the artist.
Cinthia Marcelle, The Tempest, 2014, photograph. Courtesy of the artist.

For her installation Dust Never Sleeps, Cinthia Marcelle transforms the Secession's Grafisches Kabinett into a deserted chamber. The room's walls and floors are coated throughout with deep black dust that renders the ravages of time and incipient dilapidation distinctly visible and palpable. The visitors are restricted to a narrow passage clearly set off from the installation's thick layer of soot; the demarcation at once also defines interior and exterior spaces. The intervention was inspired by the artist's research into the history of the art nouveau building, which was struck by a bomb during World War II and largely destroyed.

Marcelle has often staged situations and performative actions in public spaces for interventions that transmute mundane acts into poetic events. Video and photography serve her as artistic means of documentation. The ruin as an allegory of history divorced from any idea of beauty is a trope she already explored in the video O Século (The Century, 2011; with Tiago Mata Machado). Her work also refers to Walter Benjamin's conception of history as a process of inexorable decline.

An artist's book featuring a series of frottages created specifically for this occasion, a reproduction of Giorgione's La Tempesta, and an essay by Emilio Maciel will be published in conjunction with the exhibition.

Cinthia Marcelle was born in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, in 1974. She lives and works in São Paulo.

Invited by the board of the Secession
Curator: Jeanette Pacher



Chto Delat?
Time Capsule. Artistic Report on Catastrophes and Utopia
November 21, 2014 – January 25, 2015


Chto Delat?, installation view of Russian Woods at BWA Wroclav, 2013 

Chto Delat? (What is to be done?) was founded in early 2003 in Petersburg by a working group of artists, critics, philosophers, and writers from Petersburg, Moscow, and Nizhny Novgorod with the goal of merging political theory, art, and activism.

The name of the group derives from a novel by the Russian nineteenth-century writer Nikolai Chernyshevsky and immediately brings reminiscences of the first socialist workers' self-organizations in Russia, which Lenin portrayed in his "What is to be done?" (1902). Chto Delat? sees itself as a self-organizing platform for cultural workers intent on politicizing their "knowledge production" through reflections and redefinitions of an engaged autonomy for cultural practice today.

Chto Delat? works through collective initiatives organized by "art soviets," inspired by the councils formed in revolutionary Russia during the early twentieth century. These "art soviets" want to trigger a new model of the politics of collective work based on a synthesis of participatory and representational politics. In general, Chto Delat? is based on the principles of initiatives and shared responsibilities, functioning as a counter-power that plans, localizes, and executes projects collectively. In addition to conventional artistic and research activities, Chto Delat? also conceives of itself as a new type of institution and community-building tool.

This process usually results in artistic interventions, exhibitions, or artworks (video films, radio plays, graphics, and murals, as well as learning theater), which in turn trigger new issues of the newspaper. Most of these projects have a twofold intent: on the one hand, we are interested in the translatability and actualization of leftist theory (classical Marxism, post-structuralism, post-operaism, critical theory) and artistic methods (dialectical realism, estrangement devices, Situationism, institutional critique etc.) under post-socialist conditions and how this relates to parallel efforts elsewhere. On the other hand, we have also often focused on actualizations of the potential of the Soviet past repressed in the course of Soviet history.

Since 2008, some members of the collective have begun to develop the songspiel, a new form of music play realized in the form of video films. We started to use this term to describe a special form of political musical, where we introduce to the audience a set of characters acting in a particular historical situation and a chorus that comments on their position and behavior in song.

This particular form and method refers to ancient tragedy and is also a specific development of the Brechtian method of estrangement, which through song and subversive dialogue reveals relations of power. All our songspiels, concerts, and musicals are attempts to create a new form of contemporary tragedy in which people (the public) call for consolidation in order to combat the collapse of society.

All of these projects have been accompanied by issues of our newspaper. Most issues are fully bilingual (English/Russian). The editorial process draws artists, critics, activists, and philosophers into a heated editorial debate, which results in theoretical essays, art projects, open-source translations, questionnaires, dialogues, and comic strips. The take-away publication is distributed for free at congresses or exhibitions, social forums, and rallies where it reaches a broader cultural public.

The platform Chto Delat? is coordinated by a working group including following members: Olga Egorova/Tsaplya (artist, Petersburg), Artiom Magun (philosopher, Petersburg), Nikolai Oleinikov (artist, Moscow), Natalia Pershina/Glyuklya (artist, Petersburg), Alexei Penzin (philosopher, Moscow), David Riff (art critic, Moscow), Alexander Skidan (poet, critic, Petersburg), Oxana Timofeeva (philosopher, Moscow), and Dmitry Vilensky (artist, Petersburg). In 2012, the choreographer Nina Gasteva joined the collective after few years of intense collaboration. Since then, many Russian and international artists and researchers have participated in different projects realized under the collective name Chto Delat?.
(Text by Chto Delat?)

For their exhibition at the Secession, Chto Delat? will create an installation for the main space with a new musical and dance film dedicated to the condition of jail in its center.

Invited by the board of the Secession
Curated by Bettina Spörr



Renata Lucas
November 21, 2014 – January 25, 2015

Renata Lucas’s works examine how the built environment influences our actions and social relations. With her sophisticated interventions, the Brazilian artist seeks to deconstruct the existing social definitions of spaces and structures and to present possible new ways of using them, putting the concept of private as well as public property up for discussion. For Atlas (São Paulo, 2006), Lucas took up a simmering boundary conflict between the gallery exhibiting her work, Galeria Antonio Millan, and its neighbors. By moving the neighbor’s fence on one side onto the gallery’s lot, the artist produced a literal visualization of the object of their dispute. On the other side of the gallery, which is located in a neighborhood with lots of parking garages and car repair shops, she set up a parking lot—this, too, was a response to the environment.

Her site-specific interventions are often realized only after extensive research and complex negotiations. The dialogue between agents, such as an institution, and the affected parties like the owners of abutting properties is a prerequisite for her work—and it is always possible that this process will come to naught. Lucas’s artistic practice, which aims to displace conventional perceptions, often involves methods of addition, duplication, and superimposition. In Cruzamento (Intersection, Rio de Janeiro, 2003), for example, Lucas covered an entire intersection with plywood panels. The subtle alteration—some viewers did not even see it at first glance—marked out a temporary stage of sorts, turning the pedestrians and drivers present at any moment into players. The rattling noise produced by the panels, which were loosely laid on the pavement, added a strong acoustic component to the installation.

In Falha (Failure, 2003/2007), the artist recycled the plywood from Cruzamento, which were now furnished with hinges and covered the floor at REDCAT Gallery, Los Angeles, in its entirety. The ability to reconfigure the overall impression of the room by moving the plywood brought around the visitors together in spontaneous interaction; it took their combined strength to set the panels upright, flip them over, or stack them in new ways.

Renata Lucas was born in Ribeirão Preto (Brazil) in 1971. She lives in Rio de Janeiro.

Invited by the board of the Secession
Curated by Jeanette Pacher



PETER BARTOŠ
Situations 1945 – 2014
November 21, 2014 – January 25, 2015

Peter Bartoš, Zooparticipacie, ca. 1976
Peter Bartoš, Zooparticipacie, ca. 1976

Like Julius Koller, Peter Bartoš is an early representative of conceptual and action art in Slovakia. Coming from an exploration of painting as a process, he realized actions in the late 1960s in which he poured paints onto various support media or dusted the streets and squares of Bratislava with grids of cinders, dust, chalk powder, or peat. His primary interest in working with these materials concerned their physical qualities, the temporary nature of the process, and the ways in which accumulation or dispersion might transform substances.

Another important source of inspiration for Bartoš, who is regarded as one of the most eccentric figures in the Slovakian conceptual art scene, is nature. He worked with animals on several occasions, as in the 1971 action Releasing the Pigeons (Vypúšt’anie holubov na slobodu), which must be read in the context of the isolation of his country at the time. The artist himself wrote: “…I was also interested in the immediate ‘zoomedium’ or in ‘animal art’ as a biological and psychological antecedent to the interrelation between the forms of life on earth, as well as in the design and establishment of an ecological culture.” Many of his conceptual works, which Bartoš often updates and refines over the course of decades, tie questions of ecological planning and landscape design together with issues of freedom and privacy in connection with (national political) borders.

Peter Bartoš, b. Prague, 1938, lives and works in Bratislava.
Invited by the board of the Secession
Curated by Annette Südbeck



PERMANENT EXHIBITION
Gustav Klimt: THE BEETHOVEN FRIEZE



OPENING HOURS
Tuesday to Sunday 10.00 a.m. – 6.00 p.m.


GUIDED TOURS
Saturdays and Sundays at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.



The exhibitions are realized through support of:

Erste Bank – Partner of the Secession
Bundesministerium für Unterricht, Kunst und Kultur
Wien Kultur
Friends of the Secession



For further information and photographic material please contact:
 
Katharina Schniebs
Secession, Association of Visual Artists Vienna Secession
Friedrichstraße 12, 1010 Vienna
Tel: +43-1-5875307-10, Fax: +43-1-5875307-34
E-mail: presse@secession.at