EXHIBITION PROGRAM   2013   2012   2011   2010   2009   2008   2007   2006   2005   2004   2003   2002   2001   2000   1999   1998   1997   1996   /// ARTIST INDEX 1996-2013



February 23 – April 15, 2012
RUDOLF STINGEL

MICHAEL SNOW




March 23 – November 4, 2012
extended until April 7, 2013
GERWALD ROCKENSCHAUB




May 3 – June 17, 2012
David Claerbout

Stephan Dillemuth

Slavs and Tatars




June 29 – September 2, 2012
Mutatis Mutandis
Group show curated by Catherine David




September 21 – November 25, 2012
Kerry James Marshall


Anne Hardy


Anja Kirschner & David Panos




December 7, 2012 – February 10, 2013
Yael Bartana

Liz Deschenes

Fiona Rukschcio




PERMANENT EXHIBITION
Gustav Klimt: THE BEETHOVEN FRIEZE




OPENING HOURS

GUIDED TOURS
Tuesday to Sunday 10.00 a.m. – 6.00 p.m.

Saturdays at 3.00 p.m. and Sundays at 11.00 a.m.





Rudolf Stingel
February 23 – April 15, 2012

Installation view of "Rudolf Stingel", Whitney Museum, New York 2011, Photograph by Stefan Altenburger, Courtesy of the artist
Installation view of "Rudolf Stingel", Whitney Museum, New York 2011, Photograph by Stefan Altenburger, Courtesy of the artist

For more than twenty years, Rudolf Stingel’s works have interrogated the concept of painting and expanded its definition. In the 1980s, he demystified the image of the artist as an inspired inventor, which was then still widely held, by publishing a book entitled “Instructions / Istruzioni / Anleitung” that revealed how his abstract paintings were made and included directions enabling anyone to imitate them.

In addition to the classical means of painting, such as paint and canvas, Stingel employs industrial materials like insulation panels, styrofoam, carpeting, and potter’s clay. Since the early 1990s, he has used these materials to “carpet” now the floors, now the walls of exhibition rooms, in a significant contribution that has defined the contemporary debate over the relationship between painting and space. Lined with a monochrome carpet or silvery insulation panels, space itself becomes the support medium of “painting,” or rather, of monochrome color. The artist’s interest in the materials he employs also extends to their specific surface qualities and the ways in which they can be modulated: impressions left on a carpet can easily be obliterated, restoring a tabula rasa sort of state, whereas the graffiti-like engravings in the insulation panels are lasting traces of human interaction.

In 2005, Stingel created a portrait of his gallerist, Paula Cooper, adding this classical genre to his otherwise abstract oeuvre in a new branch of his oeuvre that has since grown into a series of photorealistic self-portraits in shades of gray based on b&w photographs.

At the Secession, Rudolf Stingel presents a new work produced specifically for this context.
Rudolf Stingel, who was born in Meran (IT) in 1956, lives and works in New York (USA) and Meran (IT).



Michael Snow
Recent Works
February 23 – April 15, 2012

Michael Snow, Piano Sculpture, 2009, Installation with four projections, 15 min looped
Michael Snow, Piano Sculpture, 2009, Installation with four projections, 15 min looped

Michael Snow. Recent Works is the first solo show presenting the work of the influential Canadian artist Michael Snow in Austria. The exhibition features selected photographs and film installations from the past ten years that exemplify the spectrum of his art. An experimental filmmaker, painter, sculptor, photographer, and professional jazz musician, Snow has worked in a wide range of media for more than fifty years. His art is defined by his sustained interest in questions of the perception of reality and its eidetic representation as well as the means of that representation itself. Applying a rigorous approach, he examines the structures, processes, and limitations of the various media, often operating in the interstices and exploring one medium from the perspective of another. Each one of his works pursues a specific strategy. The works on display in the Secession address issues including simultaneity in the interplay between image and sound, the plane of projection as the basis for the perception of filmic imagery, beholders’ perspectives, and the object status of what photography depicts, or in other words, its realism.

Michael Snow, who was born in Toronto (CA), lives and works in Toronto (CA).
In collaboration with the Film Museum, Vienna



Close-up – GUSTAV KLIMT ~ GERWALD ROCKENSCHAUB – Plattform
A project by the Secession, the Federal Office for the Protection of Monuments, and the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna
March 23 – November 4, 2012 extended until April 7, 2013

Gerwald Rockenschaub, Plattform, Photo: MargheritaSpiluttini
Gerwald Rockenschaub, Plattform, Photo: MargheritaSpiluttini

Calling certainties into question, broadening horizons, shifting viewpoints: with the twin exhibition projects “Close-up – GUSTAV KLIMT ~ GERWALD ROCKENSCHAUB – Plattform,” artist Gerwald Rockenschaub, Austria’sFederal Office for the Protection of Monuments, and the restorers of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna reflect on a key work from the period of artistic renewal at the dawn of the twentieth century. On the 150th anniversary of Klimt’s birth, the Secession offers visitors a detailed look at the Beethoven Frieze, shedding both scientific and artistic light on this icon of cultural history.



David Claerbout
Diese Sonne strahlt immer
May 3 – June 17, 2012

David Claerbout, Long Goodbye, 2007
David Claerbout, Long Goodbye, 2007

The Belgian artist David Claerbout works primarily with time-based media such as animation, video and sound as well as photography. His contemplative projections trace back the characteristics of these former autonomous media on the brink of disintegration. The works deliberately require tranquility and patience, often employing parallel arrangements like motion versus standstill, duration versus moment, evanescence and change versus permanence and continuity. In his first solo show in Austria, David Claerbout will present a selection of works, most of them recent. Diese Sonne strahlt immer refers to electric light as a replacement for sunlight. Claerbout is fascinated by how human perception will interpret footage that is filmed directly against the sun as ‘intense’, while being a feeble projected light beam reflected on an ordinary white wall. His works seem to regret the loss of sensorial experience and yet his subjects include natural phenomena like reflection, wind and sunlight.

His early media-critical video works are based on appropriated photographs, e.g. Kindergarten Antonio Sant’Elia, 1932 (1998) while recent fictional films take the concept of the simultaneity of antagonisms a step further; the narrative recedes into the background as natural phenomena that elude deliberate control, such as the sunlight, become the real-time protagonists (see the thirteen-hour Bordeaux Piece, 2004). To immerse themselves in Claerbout’s work, viewers accordingly need one thing above all else: plenty of time.

David Claerbout, who was born in Kortrijk (BE) in 1969, lives and works in Antwerp (BE) and Berlin (DE).
The exhibition David Clearbout is a cooperation with the government of Flanders.



Stephan Dillemuth
Öffentliche Verkehrsmittel
May 3 – June 17, 2012

Stephan Dillemuth, Brunnen, Foto: Oliver Ottenschläger
Stephan Dillemuth, Brunnen, Photo: Oliver Ottenschläger

Stephan Dillemuth believes that his possibilities as a visual artist must be conceived in light of the ongoing transformation of the modern public sphere. In thinking about his own role and what he can do with his art, he examines questions such as: to which extent can self-organization and personal and collective integrity be established within the framework of our society of control? With its inherent methods of reflection, analysis, and experimentation, art, he believes, creates beauty, but it also has the potential to change society.

In order to review contemporary issues, Dillemuth sometimes studies historic movements (such as the Lebensreform movement or alternative attempts at social renewal of the 1970s) and situations of social transformation (such as the Munich Soviet Republic of 1918–19), but his experimental artistic means always also call his research in question, generating new insight. The results of these experiments include installations, theatrical performances, and collaborative works as well as videos, lectures, and publications.

Stephan Dillemuth, who was born in Büdingen (DE), lives and works in Munich (DE).
www.societyofcontrol.com/



Slavs and Tatars
Not Moscow Not Mecca
May 3 – June 17, 2012

Slavs and Tatars, Not Moscow Not Mecca, 2012, Foto: Oliver Ottenschläger
Slavs and Tatars, Not Moscow Not Mecca, 2012, Photo: Oliver Ottenschläger

Slavs and Tatars is a faction of polemics and intimacies devoted to an area east of the former Berlin Wall and west of the Great Wall of China known as Eurasia. The collective’s work spans several media, disciplines, and a broad spectrum of cultural registers (high and low). Slavs and Tatars has published Kidnapping Mountains (Book Works, 2009), Love Me, Love Me Not: Changed Names (onestar press, 2010), and Molla Nasreddin: the magazine that would've, could've, should've (JRP-Ringier, 2011). Their work has been exhibited at Salt, Istanbul, Tate Modern, the 10th Sharjah, 8th Mercosul, and 3rd Thessaloniki Biennials. After devoting the past five years primarily to two cycles of work, namely, a celebration of complexity in the Caucasus (Kidnapping Mountains, Molla Nasreddin, Hymns of No Resistance) and the unlikely heritage between Poland and Iran (em>Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi'ite Showbiz, 79.89.09, A Monobrow Manifesto), Slavs and Tatars have begun work on their third cycle, The Faculty of Substitution, on mystical protest and the revolutionary role of the sacred and syncretic. The new cycle of work includes contributions to group exhibitions– Reverse Joy at the GfZK, Leipzig, PrayWay at the New Museum Triennial and Régions d’Être at the Asia Pacific Triennial–as well as solo engagements with Not Moscow Not Mecca at the Secession, Vienna, Khhhhhhh at Moravian Gallery, Brno, Beyonsense at MoMA, NY and Künstlerhaus Stuttgart.

Slavs and Tatars is a collective founded in 2006.



Mutatis Mutandis
Group show curated by Catherine David
with: Babak Afrassiabi, Edgar Arceneaux, Hany Armanious, Louidgi Beltrame, Andrea Branzi, Elisabetta Benassi, Luke Fowler, Suzanne Treister
June 29 – September 2, 2012


Secession Wien, Hauptraum
Secession Wien, Hauptraum

In 2012 the French curator Catherine David is invited to develop an exhibition project for all exhibition spaces at the Secession. From 1994 to 1997 Catherine David was arts director of Documenta X in Kassel, and from 2002 to 2004director of Witte de With Centre for Contemporary Art in Rotterdam. After studying linguistics and art history, she worked as a curator at the Centre Pompidou (1981–1990), before moving to the Jeu de Paume (1990–94), both in Paris. Since 1998 she has been head of the Représentations Arabes Contemporaines project, which takes the form of exhibitions, seminars and publications in various European cities. In 2005–06 Catherine David was guest researcher at the prestigious Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin, where she continued her work on the Arab world. In 2007 she organised the interdisciplinary event "Di/Visions: Culture and Politics of the Middle East" at the House of World Cultures in Berlin and Bahman Jalali retrospective at Tapiès Fondation in Barcelona. In 2009 David was curator of ADACH (Abu Dhabi Authority for Culture and Heritage) pavilion at the Venice Biennal. Her last publication is Hassan Sharif. Works 1973-2011 (Hatje Cantz).



Kerry James Marshall
Who’s Afraid of Red, Black and Green
September 21 – November 25, 2012

Kerry James Marshall, Black Star II, 2012
Kerry James Marshall, Black Star II, 2012

In his figurative pictures, many of which work with the conventions of history painting, the American artist Kerry James Marshall addresses the social and cultural experiences of African Americans and, more generally, the variety of ways identities are coded and marginalized within a dominant culture. His depictions of everyday life in urban housing projects (Garden Projects series, 1994–95) and middle-class living rooms decorated with pictures of revered civil-rights heroes (Souvenir series, 1997–98) as well as his double portraits in historic garb (Vignettes, 2003–07) pay homage to the utopias of the civil-rights movement and bring a confident and reflective approach to defining shifting ideas about integration and history, of individual fulfillment and freedom. The ambiguity of the scenes Marshall depicts and the way he depicts them always also raise the question of how we read images and what our judgment is based on.

Building on the logic of collage, Marshall has developed a complex pictorial language that crosses cultures by fusing references to Western art history with stylistic elements of a Black aesthetics. His art is also shaped by his painterly interest in the formal qualities of flatness. He has found a way to translate the reality of Blackness into his paintings by using shades of black that make figurative elements appear almost abstract, while his textures of drippings, spatterings, and brushstrokes disrupt the classical conception of spatial depth, suggesting a break with reality and the naturalism usually associated with history painting.

Kerry James Marshall, who was born in Birmingham, ALm (USA), in 1955, lives and works in Chicago (USA).



Anne Hardy
September 21 – November 25, 2012

Anne Hardy, Incidence, 2009, Courtesy Maureen Paley, London
Anne Hardy, Incidence, 2009, Courtesy Maureen Paley, London

Anne Hardy’s large-format photographs are polyvalent images of artificial spaces created for the sole purpose of their photographic documentation. In painstaking work that often takes months, the artist builds highly detailed life-sized “stage sets” in her studio using found objects, things bought in second-hand stores, leftovers, and refuse scavenged from the street. Hardy then takes a single picture of each set in order to define its depiction, exercising tight control in particular over our perspective on these fictional spaces. Serving as documents of now absent places, the images show situations that are often confusing, filled with traces of human presence and mysterious activities; disturbingly, however, the fictional protagonists are forever absent. Another characteristic feature that pervades Hardy’s work is the ingenious and very deliberate employment of mirrors, which the artist uses to create the impression of spatial depth on the two-dimensional surface of the photographs—an impression, however, characterized by fragmentation or unusual visual angles. Hardy herself describes her photographs as “fictional documentation.” Her art negotiates the question of the real in visual media also by skillfully unsettling the perception of reality by means of its—patent—construction. Anne Hardy’s exhibition at the Secession is the first to present her work in Austria.

Anne Hardy, who was born in St Albans, Hertfordshire (UK), in 1970, lives and works in London (UK).



Anja Kirschner & David Panos
Ultimate substance
September 21 – November 25, 2012

Anja Kirschner & David Panos, Courtesy of the artists and Hollybush Gardens, Foto: Alessandra Chila
Anja Kirschner & David Panos, Courtesy of the artists and Hollybush Gardens, Foto: Alessandra Chila

The films of Anja Kirschner and David Panos stage collisions of historical, literary, and popular culture references in complex dramas that reflect on the role of art in society and its relation to socio-political phenomena like gentrification and financial speculation. Their fragmentary mode of narration moves, on the basis of conscientious research, between documentation, historical actualisation, melodramatic staging and a critical engagement with different genre devices and modes of performance.

Their recent films have looked at the historic emergence of art in relation to class and political power. The Last Days of Jack Sheppard, set in the early 18th Century, dramatises the relation between the thief and jailbreaker Jack Sheppard and the entrepreneur and author Daniel Defoe to draw out the relations between fiction, abstraction, and finance capital. The Empty Plan (2010) looks at theory and praxis in the work of Bertolt Brecht, playfully reimagining scenes of Brecht in exile in California, working on his unfinished theoretical work The Messingkauf Dialogues, and interpolating these with rehearsals of his 1931 play The Mother, in which Brecht’s techniques are contrasted with those of Stanislavskian naturalism.

At the Secession, Kirschner and Panos will premiere a new film that they've been working on in Greece over the period of one year. It will draw on a diverse set of references including archaeology, philosophy, pedagogy and ritual and explore the way in which monetisation and industrial labour have transformed the way we see, represent and interact with the world and the affective impact they have on our lived experience.

Ultimate Substance was commissioned by Secession (AT), Extra City Kunsthal Antwerpen (BE), Liverpool Biennial and FACT (UK), with support from Neuer Berliner Kunstverein (DE), CentrePasquArt Biel (CH), DEMERGON Daskalopoulos Foundation for Culture and Development (GR) and Artscouncil England.

Anja Kirschner (born 1977 in Munich, DE) and David Panos (born 1971 in Athens, GR) live and work in London (GB) and Athens (GR).
http://kirschner-panos.info/



Yael Bartana
Wenn Ihr wollt, ist es kein Traum
Fragen an Herzl und Freud
December 7, 2012 – February 10, 2013

Yael Bartana, Mur i Wieża, 2009, Courtesy of Annet Gelink Gallery, Amsterdam and Sommer Contemporary Art Gallery, Tel Aviv
Yael Bartana, Mur i Wieża, 2009, Courtesy of Annet Gelink Gallery, Amsterdam and Sommer Contemporary Art Gallery, Tel Aviv

The work of Israeli artist and filmmaker Yael Bartana deals with current social rituals and structures in general, and with issues surrounding the cultural identity of her native country, its historical construction, and the resulting tensions and conflicts in particular. In her distinctive poetic manner, she creates a balance between fact and invention, documentation and propaganda, ironically undermining certainties, standing symbols on their heads, and opening up multiple new meanings.

In 2007 Bartana founded the Jewish Renaissance Movement in Poland (JRMiP), both a political movement and an art project that calls for the return of 3.3 million Jews to the land of their ancestors. Oscillating between reality and fiction, and appealing to collective powers of political and social imagination, both the JRMiP and the film trilogy structured around its activities And Europe Will Be Stunned, have sparked debate and won recognition around the world. Bartana showed the complete trilogy for first time in 2011 when she represented Poland at the 54th Venice Biennial.

The first International Congress of the JRMiP took place in May 2012 in Berlin. The three-day event served as a forum for discussing the social and political changes that would be necessary in the EU, Poland, and Israel to adequately support the appeal launched by the JRMiP, inviting those attending to collectively imagine this utopia. The film about the congress will be shown at the Secession for the first time, fostering further exploration of existing ideas and the creation of new perspectives.

Yael Bartana (born 1970 in Kfar Yehezkel, Israel) lives and works in Tel Aviv and Amsterdam.



Liz Deschenes
December 7, 2012 – February 10, 2013

Liz Deschenes, Tilt / Swing (360° field of vision, version 1), 2009, Installation view, Courtesy Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York, Photo: John Berens
Liz Deschenes, Tilt / Swing (360° field of vision, version 1), 2009, Installation view, Courtesy Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York, Photo: John Berens

"My work is in reaction to the limited scope that photography is often understood by. I think photography is capable of much more than representing a particular moment in time." (Liz Deschenes)

Liz Deschenes' photographs are concrete, self-reflexive, and mysterious all at once. In them, she points to the autonomy of photography as an artistic medium beyond its usual tasks and uses. For some years now, her work has consisted almost exclusively of photograms—images made without a camera—whose surfaces bear the traces of processing and chemical treatment. In a dialog with painting, sculpture, and architecture, Deschenes explores the boundaries of photography, always with close reference to the medium's history. With subtle interventions and site-specific photo installations, she has recently turned her attention to the conditions of exhibiting, allowing viewers to question not only conventional ways of looking at photography but also their own viewing habits.

"The monochrome and other self-reflexive practices do not have a deep history in the photographic medium, mainly because of the medium's inherent ability to record and document." (Liz Deschenes) Deschenes' work on an expanded definition of photography deals critically with the medium's central property, i.e., its (seemingly) faithful replication of reality, a quality that has always dominated its usage in both practical and artistic contexts, leaving little room for self-reflexive and monochrome artistic strategies.

"The camera reproduces the visual field of the Cyclops, not of a human being!" (Pierre Francastel)
The site-specific installation created by Deschenes specially for the Secession is a critical reflection on photographic vision (in the double sense of "seeing" and "being seen"). Specifically, Deschenes refers to stereoscopy, a hybrid of mechanical/apparatus-based and human/natural seeing that simulates human three-dimensional vision while retaining characteristics of the two-dimensional photographic image. Deschenes' installations are as subtle as her works that "do not automatically reveal everything" (LD).

Liz Deschenes (born 1966 in Boston) lives and works in New York.



Fiona Rukschcio
retaped Rape.
December 7, 2012 – February 10, 2013

Fiona Rukschcio, Dans la peau la Mémoire, Collage, 2009
Fiona Rukschcio, Dans la peau la Mémoire, Collage, 2009

In her films, collages, and projects, Fiona Rukschcio focuses on roles ascribed to women, identity formation by internal and external forces, and extreme emotional experiences. By combining research and documentary materials with her own subjectively charged perceptions, she develops a heterogeneous visual language juxtaposing archive material and the aesthetics of the everyday.

For the Secession she has produced a new film based on Rape (1968) by Yoko Ono and John Lennon.
Rukschcio re-filmed the original, in which a young woman is followed by the cameraman through the city of London and back to her apartment, using the same shots in the same locations, but without the woman. This shift raises a series of questions about the links between camera idiom, gazes, violence, and places as collective storehouses of memory.

Fiona Rukschcio (born 1972 in Vienna) lives and works in Vienna.



PERMANENT EXHIBITION
Gustav Klimt: THE BEETHOVEN FRIEZE



OPENING HOURS
Tuesday to Sunday 10.00 a.m. – 6.00 p.m.


GUIDED TOURS
Saturdays at 3.00 p.m. and Sundays at 11.00 a.m.



The exhibitions are realized through support of:

Erste Bank – Partner of the Secession
Bundesministerium für Unterricht, Kunst und Kultur
Wien Kultur
Friends of the Secession



For further information and photographic material please contact:
 
Karin Jaschke
Secession, Association of Visual Artists Vienna Secession
Friedrichstraße 12, 1010 Vienna
Tel: +43-1-5875307-10, Fax: +43-1-5875307-34
E-mail: presse@secession.at